Finding Inspiration

Snoopy's Night Idea
Standard

A question writers (and other types of artists) often get is “Where do you find your inspiration?” I honestly get mine from everywhere. My family. My friends. My coworkers. My surroundings. My travels. My experiences. My fears. My doubts. My successes. You get the picture?

Background vector created by Bluelela – Freepik.com

As far as inspiration goes, everything you consume is material. Movies you watch, novels you read, music you hear, conversations you overhear, the human emotions and actions you witness. You can create a story for the situations you encounter.

Why is the man screaming at the store clerk? Well, maybe his father just died, and he’s having trouble dealing with it. Why is the woman crying at the bus stop? Well, maybe she just spent the last of her money on medication and doesn’t have enough money left to pay rent. There are endless possibilities with stories because no two authors will tell stories in the same way.

Good writing practice is to find a headline in a newspaper (printed or online) and retell the story with great details about what happened before or after the story. There are also some books with writing prompts that are helpful to get into the habit of writing every day if you need that kind of discipline. *I am not a writer to writes every day. I only write when I am inspired or have a strict deadline (in the case of writing for my day job at a university). I find that forcing myself to write when I am not inspired causes a headache and a lot of junk that I end up cutting out during the editing process.

Another good way to practice writing is to find a song that you love and write a story or poem to go along with it. How does the song make you feel? Who or what is the song about?

I think about things I’ve read and wonder how the stories could be different. I think about situations my friends have experienced and how their stories could be told in different ways. Many of my stories feature characters who have certain traits I’ve taken from friends, family, or myself. It makes my characters feel real to me, and hopefully to my readers. This is especially true with showing the characters’ flaws. In fiction, flaws make the characters feel real to me. It’s the flaws and human emotion conveyed that make me what to jump into the pages (or through the e-reader screen) to hug the character.

There is inspiration all around you if you look for it or let it find you. I keep a notebook beside my bed in case I get an idea in the middle of the night. So many of my ideas just come to me in my dreams, or while considering the “what ifs” of life as I’m trying to fall asleep after I’ve exhausted myself reading or playing word games on my phone.

For more information on the types of written content I produce, read more: Continue reading

Book reviews for 2018

Standard

My original reading challenge for 2018 was to read 60 books. Well, I read 60 books and upped my challenge to 80, then 100. By the end of New Year’s Eve, I had read 106 books for the year. This number does not include the children’s books I read with my daughter.

by Bluelela - Freepik.com

In 2018, I read many novels written by independent authors, such as myself. These stories are just as good as (and many times better than) traditionally published work The top five were:

(image by Bluelela – Freepik.com)

  1. When Life Happened by Jewel E. Ann. This novel pulled me in fast, made me cry, made me see hope, and made me cry again before a satisfying ending. I stumbled upon the novel and have now read several others by the author but none I have loved as much as this one.
  2. Fiendish by Meka James. Wow. This book was probably the scariest I’ve ever read, and I grew up on Stephen King. A modern-day take on Beauty and the Beast with an emphasis on “beast.” Trigger warning: This novel contains graphic depictions of male on female domestic abuse.
  3. Waiting for Wyatt by S.D. Hendrickson. I am a sucker for contemporary romance. A guy in pain who uses all his energy to care for dogs no one else wants and a girl desperate to save the guy and a dog, what’s not to love?
  4. 6 in the Styx by Brad Carl. Six off-the-wall stories, each one crazier and more demented than the next. A perfect quick-read from a talented indie author. Not for the faint of heart.
  5. Broken Tomorrows by KT Daxon. Although this novel is no longer available, it is the child of a new author who took a chance on her dream and then needed to reset and reevaluate her goals for a while. This was a well-written first novel about love and loss. The love the author had for her characters bled from each page. I hope the author decides to write again in the future.

Of course, I read many traditionally published novels last year as well. My top-ten are below:

Continue reading

When I grow up

Standard

Background vector created by Iconicbestiary – Freepik.com

When you were a kid, what did you want to be when you grew up? I think my first answer to that question was a mommy. I would play with my dolls and pretend I was their mommy. I would change their clothes, pack a diaper bag, and have my dolls ride in a toy car seat buckled into the car. Basically, I would imitate how my mother took care of my baby sister.

Frame vector created by Sapann-Design – Freepik.com

Next, I wanted to be a teacher. I used to play school with my stuffed animals all the time. Looking back, I find this ironic because there were times when I hated school. I felt lonely and left out sometimes. Other times, there was too much attention when I would have preferred to blend in. Adolescence can be difficult for the meek. Thank God for great teachers, friends, my family, and a lousy guidance counselor (or was she?) who had reservations about me “making it” in college so far away from my comfort zone. At any hard time when I briefly entertained the thought of quitting, I thought about that guidance counselor’s comment and decided that succeeding—if only to spite her—was worth it. Continue reading